25
$\begingroup$

I could imagine that several very long Mathoverflow answers have eventually turned into expository papers. For example, I have posted this (unpublished) expository paper on the arxiv about various notions of zero-dimensionality as a response to a MO question. What are some examples of some answers to Mathoverflow questions which have eventually grown into expository papers or other forms of mathematical exposition (such as a section in a textbook or even a piece of software)?

In this question, people gave examples of good original research that has arisen from mathoverflow answers, but I want to now see examples of published mathematical exposition which have arisen as the result of Mathoverflow answers.

$\endgroup$

4 Answers 4

12
$\begingroup$

This paper resulted from a question on mathoverflow. This monograph on properties of 3-manifold groups has now appeared in print.

$\endgroup$
2
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Do you know which question specifically? Among the MO questions that left a "trackback / blog link" to the arxiv page, only these two were asked before the survey was posted: mathoverflow.net/questions/32292 mathoverflow.net/questions/63321 and the first seems a likely candidate. I couldn't find it in the paper itself since MO is not explicitly cited there. (However, the authors thank Anton Geraschenko for bringing them together -- is that a veiled reference to MO?) $\endgroup$
    – j.c.
    Commented Mar 27, 2017 at 18:36
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ It might be one of those questions, or this question, which was asked by Stefan Friedl and answered by Henry Wilton: mathoverflow.net/q/15121/1345 In any case, I'm not exactly sure, but I think one of them told me that the collaboration started via mathoverflow (and I think that's the reference in the paper to Anto Geraschenko). $\endgroup$
    – Ian Agol
    Commented Mar 27, 2017 at 20:51
9
$\begingroup$

The note "Did a 1-dimensional magnet detect a 248-dimensional Lie algebra?" by David Borthwick and Skip Garibaldi mentioned in this MO answer by Garibaldi was published here in the Notices of the AMS.

$\endgroup$
9
$\begingroup$

My preprint arXiv:1609.01160 was written in response to Question 248665.

$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

Many answers by Joel David Hamkins have been the inspiration behind later papers, for example "Is the twin prime conjecture independent of Peano arithmetic?" is an arXiv submission that is developed from a 2012 MO answer, as detailed in Hamkins's blog post of the same name.

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .