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I could imagine that several very long Mathoverflow answers have eventually turned into expository papers. For example, I have posted this (unpublished) expository paper on the arxiv about various notions of zero-dimensionality as a response to a MO question. What are some examples of some answers to Mathoverflow questions which have eventually grown into expository papers or other forms of mathematical exposition (such as a section in a textbook or even a piece of software)?

In this question, people gave examples of good original research that has arisen from mathoverflow answers, but I want to now see examples of published mathematical exposition which have arisen as the result of Mathoverflow answers.

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This paper resulted from a question on mathoverflow. This monograph on properties of 3-manifold groups has now appeared in print.

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    $\begingroup$ Do you know which question specifically? Among the MO questions that left a "trackback / blog link" to the arxiv page, only these two were asked before the survey was posted: mathoverflow.net/questions/32292 mathoverflow.net/questions/63321 and the first seems a likely candidate. I couldn't find it in the paper itself since MO is not explicitly cited there. (However, the authors thank Anton Geraschenko for bringing them together -- is that a veiled reference to MO?) $\endgroup$ – j.c. Mar 27 '17 at 18:36
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    $\begingroup$ It might be one of those questions, or this question, which was asked by Stefan Friedl and answered by Henry Wilton: mathoverflow.net/q/15121/1345 In any case, I'm not exactly sure, but I think one of them told me that the collaboration started via mathoverflow (and I think that's the reference in the paper to Anto Geraschenko). $\endgroup$ – Ian Agol Mar 27 '17 at 20:51
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The note "Did a 1-dimensional magnet detect a 248-dimensional Lie algebra?" by David Borthwick and Skip Garibaldi mentioned in this MO answer by Garibaldi was published here in the Notices of the AMS.

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My preprint arXiv:1609.01160 was written in response to Question 248665.

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