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"Coloring Gaussian integers based on a numeral system based on powers of $-1+i$" was an interesting question that was recently asked. I left a comment with some relevant keywords and links (I didn't make it an answer because I was hoping that someone more familiar with the area could say more!). The question author replied to my comment to thank me and the question was subsequently deleted — I assume the author took my response in a comment as an indication that the question wasn't MO-level, which is not what I meant at all!

I'd like to reach out to the author and suggest undeleting the question, but at this point I've forgotten who the author is and have no way of determining it as the question has vanished without a trace (I can see the reply comment in my inbox but it doesn't say whom it was from!).

Can the MO moderators reach out to the author of this post and ask him to undelete? (Or possibly undelete the post directly if that's appropriate.)

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    $\begingroup$ The question was asked by mathoverflow.net/users/4556/roland-bacher . $\endgroup$ Nov 7 at 14:27
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    $\begingroup$ I will just add that the deleted question (and, consequently, the OP) can be seen by 10k+ users. And anybody can see the question in Google Cache - at least for some short period of time. $\endgroup$ Nov 7 at 14:51
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    $\begingroup$ This whole exchange and situation makes me thankful that there are so many kind and thoughtful people here on MathOverflow, who want to learn and do mathematics. Thank you, Alison. $\endgroup$ Nov 8 at 16:00

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Thanks to @Emil Jeřábek for finding the author of the question, whom I have now e-mailed. (ETA: it's back now!)

Thanks also to @Martin Sleziak for his answer in comments to the meta-question of "how do I find the author of/other info on a deleted question?"

I will just add that the deleted question (and, consequently, the OP) can be seen by 10k+ users. And anybody can see the question in Google Cache - at least for some short period of time. – Martin Sleziak

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