32

This is the very essence of the Feynman Algorithm for solving problems: Write down the problem. Think real hard. Write down the solution. None of these steps is easy, but we tend to skip the first step in many cases. MathOverflow does indeed force you to take it more seriously. But all in all, well done!


16

In programming, this is known as rubber duck debugging: you often figure out the solution during the process of explaining your problem in detail, even if you are explaining it just to an inanimate object like a rubber duck. It is a well-known side-benefit of Q&A sites. One of the founders of Stack Exchange described it in a blog entry. You may ...


12

This story resonates with me a lot. For me, when grappling with a new problem, it's really become an integral part of my process to try to formulate sub-problems and related questions as MO questions. Only in a minority of cases does this result in actually asking an MO question (in which case the answers are typically helpful, of course), but the other ...


4

If you want your work to be accepted by the research community, you will have to change your approach. The current post does not speak toward a healthy degree of caution and skepticism that is required for producing scientific research. Further, the summary you give of your efforts does not spark interest because the approach, as near as I can determine, ...


3

There has long been two (probably more) factions within the MathOverflow community, of which an oversimplified description is this: some want to take the time to train new users, and some don't. This user exhibits some enthusiasm and some vocabulary. However, the examples posted by the user indicate to me that considerable effort will be needed to develop ...


2

The button for the citation helper seems to have changed from the pair of links on a black background to a letter "B" just to the right of the "insert image" button. Presumably not intentional?


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