36

You own all of your posts! You retain full copyrights and you can do anything you please with them. However, by posting on MathOverflow, you release your content under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 (CC BY-SA 4.0) license. This license allows MathOverflow, Stack Exchange and others to use your content under specific terms. This ...


28

This is an answer as a private member of MO, without my moderator hat on. I'll admit I've never understood the argument that there could be something wrong with linking; the internet is a big scary place, we're (mostly) adults, and you can make a link to something for many reasons, only some of which indicate endorsement. That said, lawyers will try all ...


20

The OCILLA (part of DMCA) already specifies a process (notice and takedown) that takes care of these issues. This process also removes from us the burden of determining whether a particular link is infringing or not: this is now the responsibility of whoever prepares the notice. So MO should continue to process DMCA notices (which it already does), and no ...


18

Update: We didn't just cut it from the TOS. Given that the old wording understandably concerned people, we wanted to be crystal clear, so we literally reversed it. The old phrase: whether such Subscriber Content was created by You or others, has been changed to: with the exception of content entirely created by You, We could have just cut it, but ...


14

Since the content of MO is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC BY-SA 3.0) license, many such sites are perfectly within their rights to redistribute MO content. However, they must respect the terms of the license and the attribution requirement. Sites that redistribute MO content without proper attribution should be reported ...


12

A trademark infringement occurs when unauthorized use of a trademark (or a substantially similar mark, like a distinctive logo or motto) happens in the same domain of operation as the original. In the case of MathOverflow, this is pretty clear: another Q&A or discussion site using the MathOverflow name (or even something very similar, like the initials ...


10

All that assumes that there is some noticeable portion of users who bother to read "Terms of service", which, I'm afraid, is a rather unjustified assumption :-) So, it will, most likely, continue as usual: everybody will stick to his own common sense and customs until StackExchange will try to sue someone, which might be the end of MO and other SE sites as ...


10

All user content on MathOverflow is licensed under CC BY-SA as indicated at the bottom of each page, but the copyrights of content contributed by a user remain with the user as explained here. The Stack Exchange privacy policy applies to MathOverflow as well as every network site. The privacy policy details what information is collected from users and how ...


8

As Alec Rhea suggests, MathOverflow the corporation and MathOverflow the forum have no stance (and should have no stance) officially on defeating paywalls. It is hard for MathOverflow the community to have a stance on a potentially divisive issue. However, I think the community should have a stance on helping researchers. If there is a community member ...


8

There is neither an officially claimed copyright or trademark on the MathOverflow icons or logos. That said, we would really like anyone who intends to use it to explain their proposed use (here on meta is fine), and obtain the approval of the community (and potentially the board) first.


7

I'm certainly not a lawyer. Nevertheless, I think you've made a mistake. If I want to copy some content from MathOverflow, regardless of my conversations with the original author, I better abide by both the Terms of Service, and also the license under which that content was provided. At the same time, if the author wants to relicense their content to me, ...


2

You can’t copyright an idea, only a text. Posting something here has a copyright effect on the specific text you post, but a paper with the same ideas (but presumably a lot more exposition) would not be affected.


2

I am neither a lawyer nor an official representative of MathOverflow. My opinion is that this will cause more problems than it will solve. Suppose someone posts something defamatory on your website. You may be liable for the possible damages caused. However, the lawyers might not just sue you. They may go after MathOverflow and consider them liable too, ...


1

It seems that the answer can be found on the legal page of MO; for your convenience, let me quote the relevant paragraph concerning copyrighted material: "Using copyrighted material does not constitute infringement in all cases. In general, however, users should be careful when using copyrighted content without the permission of those who created it. It ...


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