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My belief is that it is legitimate to cite some posts of the main site MathOverflow in the classroom of some course. Under this assumption I've wondered about the following question.

I don't know those but I'm curious about the typology of different courses that are taken in different departments of mathematics or institutes of mathematics, I know the denomination of these courses but I don't know what is the meaning, motivation, scope or audience of these courses: seminars, courses that are taken by or whose instructor is a postdoctoral researcher, courses by visiting professors, crash courses, summer school of mathematical societies or universities,….

Question. I would like to know if the posts of MathOverflow are potentially interesting (I evoke the study of some theorem, example or open/research problem…) in the context of the teaching of some course for professional mathematicians, see the previous list. Many thanks.

Isn't required specify what specific theorem or example or open problem you've in mind, just I'm asking if in general if it could be interesting cite and to study posts in courses for professional mathematicans: in what situations are you thinking and why (please justify your words).

I hope that this question is interesting and suitable for this Meta, feel free to add your feedback in comments. Yesterday I've edited and deleted the post on the main site MathOverflow, this post with identifier 438468 I hope your feedback: I think that the question is interesting.

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    $\begingroup$ I'm not a professor, and at that date I'm not a student. I'm asking it as curiousity. $\endgroup$
    – user142929
    Jan 12 at 18:27
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    $\begingroup$ I thought that Meta was for asking questions about the working of MO. I suspect that this is not particularly suitable for MO itself, but the community is sometimes much more tolerant of what one might call 'soft' questions than I am (there's even a tag!), so this could possibly do well there. $\endgroup$
    – LSpice
    Jan 12 at 23:25
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    $\begingroup$ Many thanks @LSpice $\endgroup$
    – user142929
    Jan 13 at 16:16
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    $\begingroup$ Of course it's possible. I used MO answers in some of my Differential Geometry classes. $\endgroup$ Jan 17 at 0:41
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    $\begingroup$ Many thanks @MoisheKohan for your feedback, if you consider it, please expand your comment in an answer (adding those details why these were good lessons/matheatical lectures, your motivation, the goals that you had in mind... and other details that you consider important in the context of my Question). $\endgroup$
    – user142929
    Jan 17 at 18:59

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